Truth is inspiring, it is guarded by GOD, and will triumph over all opposition!

MAGIC PHANTOM BOX


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Upon researching the Hellraiser Boxes, I came upon this. It’s not accident that we have television. This is the precursor of it. Here we present: The Magic Phantom Box!

wheel

A zoetrope is one of several pre-cinema animation devices that produce the illusion of motion by displaying a sequence of drawings or photographs showing progressive phases of that motion. The name zoetrope was composed from the Greek root words ζωή zoe, “life” and τρόπος tropos, “turning”.
The basic drum-like form of the zoetrope was created in 1833 or 1834 by British mathematician William George Horner, who was aware of the recently invented and closely related phenakistoscope disc. Horner’s revolving drum had viewing slits between the pictures. He called it the “daedaleum” (sometimes misspelled “daedalum” or “daedatelum” and erroneously claimed to mean “the wheel of the devil”), a reference to the Greek myth of Daedalus.

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The daedaleum failed to become popular until the 1860s, when a variant with the viewing slits on a level above the pictures, which allowed the use of easily replaceable continuous strips of images, was patented by both English and American makers, including Milton Bradley. The American inventor William F. Lincoln named his version the “zoetrope”, meaning “wheel of life”.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoetrope

Magic-lantern

MAGIC LANTERN
The earliest projected moving images were displayed using a magic lantern zoetrope. The magic lantern or Laterna Magica is an early type of image projector developed in the 17th century. It was commonly used for educational and entertainment purposes.
The magic lantern was not only a direct ancestor of the motion picture projector, but it could itself be used to project moving images, which was achieved by the use of various types of mechanical slides.

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There has been some debate about who the original inventor of the magic lantern is, but the most widely accepted theory is that Christiaan Huygens developed the original device in the late 1650s. In the fifteenth century, however, Giovanni Fontana, a Venetian engineer, had already created a lantern that projected an image of a demon. Other sources credit the German priest Athanasius Kircher, who describes a device similar to a magic lantern in his book Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae. There are possible mentions of this device associated with Kircher as early as 1646. Even in its earliest use, it was demonstrated with monstrous images such as the Devil. Huygens’s device was even referred to as the “lantern of fright” because it was able to project spooky images that looked like apparitions. In its early development, it was mostly used by magicians and conjurers to project images, making them appear or disappear, transform from one scene into a different scene, animate normally inanimate objects, or even create the belief of bringing the dead back to life.
In the 1660s, a man named Thomas Walgensten used his so-called “lantern of fear” to summon ghosts. Such uses of this early machine were not uncommon. In fact, a common setup of the machine was to keep parts of the projector in a separate, adjoining room with only the aperture visible, to make it seem more magical and scare people. By the 18th century, use by charlatans was common for religious reasons. For example, Count Cagliostro used it to “raise dead spirits” in Egyptian masonry. Johann Georg Schröpfer of Leipzig used the magic lantern to conjure up images of spirits on smoke. Schröpfer later went insane, thinking he was pursued by real devils, and shot himself after promising an audience he would later resurrect himself.

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Phantasmagoria
The later part of the 18th century was the age of Romanticism and the Gothic novel. There was an obsession with the bizarre and the supernatural. Johann Georg Schröpfer began using the magic lantern in séances, before Paul Philidor refined the techniques. In these shows, the illusionists used the magic lantern to trick people into thinking that they had summoned up spirits of revolutionary figures with the lantern mounted on a trolley. They also summoned ghosts by requests. However, Philidor’s show was eventually closed by the authorities due to their paranoia. The audiences of these magic lantern shows reacted to the projections with bewilderment. They thought the projections were real dreams, visions, apparitions and ghosts, and the devil. This was just fueled by the fact that this is exactly what the early conjurers and magicians used them for: scaring people using these ghostly images. The next famous conjurer to utilize the magic lantern was Etienne-Gaspard Robert.
He was a Belgian inventor with an interest in magic. He held his first “fantasmagorie” at Pavillon de l’Echiquier in Paris. He began experimenting in the 1780s with techniques used to make phantasmagorias, which is basically the use of the magic lantern to conjure up supernatural images such as the devil, phantoms, or ghosts. If the images were projected onto a gauze screen, they would even seem to be floating in mid-air, making the stunt even more believable. At Pavillon de l’Echiquier, Robertson set up a public phantasmagoria and told the audience he would conjure up their dead relatives. He conjured up an image of a phantom with a dagger, and then pictures of the dead relatives. After this show, he continued to make other, bigger, more outrageous spectacles. He put the magic lantern onto wheels and patented this under the name of ‘fantascope’. He eventually moved his work to a theater, where he built up a show to a grand finale in which large shapes moved around the otherwise dark theater. Robertson also used mechanical slides to make his images move. There is a small collection of transparencies at Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers in Paris which shows a two-piece slide he used with one glass showing the face of a phantom and the other which had the image of the eyes, which when used meant the eyes could roll back and forth. Also, Robertson used multiple lanterns to project both a moving figure as well as a background for that figure. For example, a stationary projector in the front would have projected an image of a church courtyard while a moving projector from behind would project the image of the phantom The Bleeding Nun, an image which came from the novel The Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis. His shows were extremely successful. The popularity increased and eventually this phenomenon moved to England. Many observers have been quoted saying these “ghosts” were very realistic, which is partly due to people’s eyes not being trained to the phenomenon of photography and cinematography like ours today are.
Eventually, the magic lantern came to America. It continued to be used by magicians but also to project moving images for entertainment. There were even some examples of pornographic striptease slides starting in the 1920s and proceeding through the first half of the 20th century. Today, the magic lantern is primarily used only by collectors. Collector Pierre Albanese and musician Thomas Bloch premiered a live Magic Lantern show in 2008, which tours since this date.
Notice how they describe the people involved in these acts? Conjurer? Magicians? Magic is very real! And it’s dangerous territory.
Here is one “Magic Lantern” Slide Show website. http://www.slides.uni-trier.de/options.php

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CURRENT TELEVISION
Now wonder our current television sets are so mysterious. This is where it originated. From magick! The very word, “Phantansmagoria” is two words in one! Ghost/apparition and magic! So, in effect we have ghost magic!
Currently we have programs on television which revolve around magic, curses, and witchcraft. In fact, television has been consumed by them. It was once a few shows, and now it’s permeating our programming.
So, if a ghost magic box is doing it’s job, then it’s no wonder we see such evidence surrounding it. Companies like Walt Disney taking advantage of programming with occult imaging for decades now. Producers and directors which produce nothing but horror movies. There are connections and there are no coincidences.
So, Satan has fine-tuned our brains with entertainment! Coercing our minds to be led into magic, and the occult. He’s subtle and wise. It’s no accident. He works behind the scenes and accomplishes much, all the while people are becoming puppets in his plan.
Many speculate that television is one of the major contributing factors of crime in this world. Well, it’s no wonder with it’s origin and now it’s output.

One response

  1. Very interesting article, though I believe the entertainment industry, for the most part is a tool for evil influences, I was not aware of the connection to these devices.

    January 25, 2015 at 10:00 PM

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